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[Medium-sized movies] are too risky. If you look at movies like… I guess, All the President’s Men was important enough and based on a big enough transgression. But take a movie like Klute – I don’t think that movie would be made today. I mean, The Godfather would have a hard time being made today. Even if you could put up the $75 million it would take to make that movie today, and you could guarantee that it would be one of the greatest movies of all time, people would still go, “$75 million? I dunno man, that’s a lot of bread…” There are realities to our business. The bottom has fallen out. Dramas that cost more than $20 million, you’re taking a big risk. I think Soderbergh was right. And it’s sad. I think the thing is to make movies cheaper. People are migrating to television to find characters that aren’t spandex-clad superheroes.

David Fincher, in response to the question Did you see Soderbergh’s speech in San Francisco? He was lamenting the death of medium-sized movies. (via cinematicfantastic)

(Source: howtocatchamonster)

cesreveries:

“Nostalgia literally means the pain from an old wound. It’s a twinge in your heart far more powerful than memory alone. This device isn’t a spaceship, it’s a time machine. It goes backwards, and forwards…it takes us to a place where we ache to go again. It’s not called the wheel, It’s called the carousel. It let’s us travel the way a child travels - around and around, and back home again, to a place where we know we are loved”.

- Don Draper, Mad Men (The Wheel)


"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.
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"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.
Zoom Info

"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.
Zoom Info

"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.
Zoom Info

"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.
Zoom Info

"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.
Zoom Info

"I sat with the director, Nicolas Winding Refn, at the Noho Star for four hours and told him why I wasn’t going to do his movie. I think that made him like me. As it was written, I hated the character. In the script, he was a Mexican, tatted-up guy who beat and gave alcohol to his infant son. When you saw this guy, you wanted the blond people—Carey Mulligan, who played my wife, and Ryan Gosling, who played my rival for her affections—to get together. I absolutely did not want to play that role. So Refn said, ‘Make him anything you want him to be.’ And I rewrote my character." — Oscar Isaac.

(Source: justinripley)

kino-obscura:

EYES IN FILM: 2014 EDITION
"I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see." — Dziga Vertov
Left to right, top to bottom:Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder, 1945)Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945)The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)Woman on the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming (Norman Jewison, 1966)2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1977)Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert, 1977)All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, 1979)Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990)Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992)Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992)Cube (Vincenzo Natali, 1997)Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Terry Gilliam, 1998)Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)Vanilla Sky (Cameron Crowe, 2001)Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Peter Jackson, 2002)The Magdalene Sisters (Peter Mullan, 2002)Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)The Fountain (Darren Aronofsky, 2006)The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)Splice (Vincenzo Natali, 2009)Let Me In (Matt Reeves, 2010)Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012)Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)
Zoom Info
kino-obscura:

EYES IN FILM: 2014 EDITION
"I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see." — Dziga Vertov
Left to right, top to bottom:Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder, 1945)Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945)The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)Woman on the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming (Norman Jewison, 1966)2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1977)Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert, 1977)All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, 1979)Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990)Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992)Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992)Cube (Vincenzo Natali, 1997)Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Terry Gilliam, 1998)Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)Vanilla Sky (Cameron Crowe, 2001)Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Peter Jackson, 2002)The Magdalene Sisters (Peter Mullan, 2002)Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)The Fountain (Darren Aronofsky, 2006)The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)Splice (Vincenzo Natali, 2009)Let Me In (Matt Reeves, 2010)Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012)Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)
Zoom Info
kino-obscura:

EYES IN FILM: 2014 EDITION
"I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see." — Dziga Vertov
Left to right, top to bottom:Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder, 1945)Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945)The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)Woman on the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming (Norman Jewison, 1966)2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1977)Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert, 1977)All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, 1979)Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990)Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992)Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992)Cube (Vincenzo Natali, 1997)Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Terry Gilliam, 1998)Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)Vanilla Sky (Cameron Crowe, 2001)Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Peter Jackson, 2002)The Magdalene Sisters (Peter Mullan, 2002)Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)The Fountain (Darren Aronofsky, 2006)The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)Splice (Vincenzo Natali, 2009)Let Me In (Matt Reeves, 2010)Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012)Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)
Zoom Info
kino-obscura:

EYES IN FILM: 2014 EDITION
"I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see." — Dziga Vertov
Left to right, top to bottom:Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder, 1945)Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945)The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)Woman on the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming (Norman Jewison, 1966)2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1977)Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert, 1977)All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, 1979)Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990)Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992)Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992)Cube (Vincenzo Natali, 1997)Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Terry Gilliam, 1998)Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)Vanilla Sky (Cameron Crowe, 2001)Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Peter Jackson, 2002)The Magdalene Sisters (Peter Mullan, 2002)Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)The Fountain (Darren Aronofsky, 2006)The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)Splice (Vincenzo Natali, 2009)Let Me In (Matt Reeves, 2010)Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012)Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)
Zoom Info
kino-obscura:

EYES IN FILM: 2014 EDITION
"I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see." — Dziga Vertov
Left to right, top to bottom:Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder, 1945)Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945)The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)Woman on the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming (Norman Jewison, 1966)2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)Deep Red (Dario Argento, 1977)Rubens (Roland Verhavert, 1977)The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert, 1977)All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, 1979)Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990)Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992)Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992)Cube (Vincenzo Natali, 1997)Titanic (James Cameron, 1997)Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Terry Gilliam, 1998)Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)Vanilla Sky (Cameron Crowe, 2001)Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese, 2002)The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Peter Jackson, 2002)The Magdalene Sisters (Peter Mullan, 2002)Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)The Fountain (Darren Aronofsky, 2006)The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)Splice (Vincenzo Natali, 2009)Let Me In (Matt Reeves, 2010)Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012)Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)
Zoom Info

kino-obscura:

EYES IN FILM: 2014 EDITION

"I am eye. I am a mechanical eye. I, a machine, am showing you a world, the likes of which only I can see." — Dziga Vertov


Left to right, top to bottom:

Man With a Movie Camera
 (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
Un Chien Andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1929)
Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren/Alexander Hammid, 1943)
The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder, 1945)
Spellbound (Alfred Hitchcock, 1945)
The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1945)
Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)
Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
Peeping Tom
 (Michael Powell, 1960)
Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)
Woman on the Dunes
 (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)
Alphaville
 (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)
Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)
The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming (Norman Jewison, 1966)
2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Deep Red
 (Dario Argento, 1977)
Rubens
 (Roland Verhavert, 1977)
The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert, 1977)
All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, 1979)
Blade Runner
 (Ridley Scott, 1982)
Goodfellas
 (Martin Scorsese, 1990)
Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Francis Ford Coppola, 1992)
Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992)
Cube (Vincenzo Natali, 1997)
Titanic
 (James Cameron, 1997)
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
 (Terry Gilliam, 1998)
Requiem for a Dream
 (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)
Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)
Mulholland Drive
 (David Lynch, 2001)
Vanilla Sky
 (Cameron Crowe, 2001)
Gangs of New York
 (Martin Scorsese, 2002)
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
 (Peter Jackson, 2002)
The Magdalene Sisters (Peter Mullan, 2002)
Minority Report (Steven Spielberg, 2002)
The Fountain
 (Darren Aronofsky, 2006)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
 (Julian Schnabel, 2007)
Hunger (Steve McQueen, 2008)
Splice
 (Vincenzo Natali, 2009)
Let Me In (Matt Reeves, 2010)
Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)
Looper
 (Rian Johnson, 2012)
Prometheus (Ridley Scott, 2012)

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